Books

[ARC Review] Finding Jupiter by Kelis Rowe

3 Things About This Book
| Elements of Romeo and Juliet | Actual Communication Between Characters | Exploration of Grief, Family Ties, Love and Identity |


Finding Jupiter by Kelis Rowe
Published: 2022 by Walkers Books
Genre(s): Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance
Pages:
336
Format:
Paperback
ISBN:
9781529500639
Goodreads
Amazon
Book Depository
Kinokuniya



Losing family can be painful, and how we process grief differs from person to person. In Ray’s case, she refuses to ever fall in love after witnessing how torn her mother remains after her father’s death. For Orion, he does his best to become the best son a father could ever ask for—even if that means suppressing his own wants and desires—after his little sister’s untimely passing. So, what happens when these two meet? A romance that the stars will gradually align for, that’s what.

Okay, so I’m just going to admit right now that contemporary romance YA books are no longer my cup of tea. Sure, now and then, there’ll be a gem I’ll fall head over heels for, but most of the time, what I seek to read in romances doesn’t appear much in contemporary YA romances. That said, Finding Jupiter is one of those that almost hits the mark as a contemporary YA romance that I’d wholly adore, but due to a few factors, falls short.

To begin, the story is cliché. Although I knew it’d be a given since it has elements of Romeo and Juliet, I had hoped for strong characters, emotional impact and depth that would elevate the story. Sadly, that’s not entirely the case because despite Ray and Orion being strong characters, the emotional impact was dulled as I knew what was coming (and it happened exactly the way I expected it) right from the beginning, which then, made the story feel shallow.

Anyway, I greatly enjoyed the actual communication between the characters here. The way Orion and Ray don’t just talk but communicate things with each other and their parents, AND their parents doing the same with their kids is something more YA novels should have instead of the prevalent absent parents trope.

Moreover, I really appreciate that Orion is the sweet and sensitive one while Ray is more confident yet fearful of being vulnerable. It’s not often that I read about main characters like them, especially as they’re both part of the same pairing. This and the sex-positivity makes reading about their romance refreshing.

Overall, Finding Jupiter is a solid debut novel that explores grief, family ties, love and identity. The execution of the twist could’ve been better, and I would’ve preferred for the story to be less cheesy but hey, while it’s not entirely for me, it might be just the right book for you.

Thank you so much Pansing for sending me a copy of this in exchange for an honest review! Finding Jupiter by Kelis Rowe is available at all good bookstores.

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